Developing next-gen Asian socio-legal scholars

15 April 2019 | Education
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NUS Law has been awarded a US$238,000 grant by the Henry Luce Foundation to offer training on scholarly writing, research methods, publication and career planning, particularly in the Asian context 

NUS Law has been awarded US$238,000 by the Henry Luce Foundation for their project named Training Initiative for Asian Law & Society Scholars (TRIALS). Directed by NUS Law Associate Professor Lynette Chua, in collaboration with Professor David Engel of The State University of New York, Buffalo, US, TRIALS will offer training on scholarly writing, research methods, publication and career planning to the next generation of socio-legal scholars conducting research on law, society and public policy in Asian societies. The Henry Luce Foundation is an American not-for-profit foundation that seeks to enrich public discourse by promoting innovative scholarship, cultivating new leaders and fostering international understanding.

Assoc Prof Chua noted that TRIALS stemmed from the need for evidence-based research on law, particularly in Asia, where traditional doctrinal legal scholarship has not been able to meet the need for sound empirical research that can serve as the basis for more reliable, just and equitable policies, and legal strategies. She added, “TRIALS is an outgrowth of prior workshops where David and I saw the growing demand by young scholars for in-depth training and mentoring in Asian socio-legal research, which involves the use of social science theories and methods to study law and legal institutions.”

TRIALS is an outgrowth of prior workshops where David and I saw the growing demand by young scholars for in-depth training and mentoring in Asian socio-legal research, which involves the use of social science theories and methods to study law and legal institutions

To be organised by the Centre for Asian Legal Studies at NUS Law, TRIALS workshops will see some of the world’s leading international interdisciplinary legal researchers mentoring and training between 50 to 60 graduate students and early career academics across six workshops over a three-year period. NUS Law will announce the call for applications for the first two workshops on 20 April, with the first workshop to be held from 9 to 12 December this year, followed by a second from 29 June to 2 July next year.